Republicans voted against Juneteenth being a federal holiday

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The House overwhelmingly passed a bill on Wednesday that would establish June 19 as Juneteenth National Independence Day, a US federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.

While the legislation met bipartisan support in the House, more than a dozen Republicans in the chamber voted against the measure on Wednesday. The bill, which the Senate unanimously approved on Tuesday, is expected to be signed into law by President Joe Biden.
 
Some of the lawmakers who voted against the bill in the House argued the proposed holiday would only serve to divide Americans based on race, including GOP Rep. Chip Roy of Texas, who took aim at the name provided for the holiday in the legislation.
 
"This name needlessly divides our nation on a matter that should instead bring us together by creating a separate Independence Day based on the color of one's skin," Roy said in a statement.
 
Here are the lawmakers who voted against the Juneteenth bill:
  • Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona
  • Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama
  • Rep. Andrew Clyde of Georgia
  • Rep. Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee
  • Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona
  • Rep. Ronny Jackson of Texas
  • Rep. Doug LaMalfa of California
  • Rep. Thomas Massie of Kentucky
  • Rep. Tom McClintock of California
  • Rep. Ralph Norman of South Carolina
  • Rep. Mike Rogers of Alabama
  • Rep. Matt Rosendale of Montana
  • Rep. Chip Roy of Texas
  • Rep. Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin
But Wisconsin Republican Sen. Ron Johnson blocked the bill in 2020, saying that the day off for federal employees would cost US taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. Johnson dropped his objection this week despite his concerns, paving the way for the bill's passage in the Senate.
"Although I strongly support celebrating Emancipation, I objected to the cost and lack of debate," said Johnson in a statement. "While it still seems strange that having taxpayers provide federal employees paid time off is now required to celebrate the end of slavery, it is clear that there is no appetite in Congress to further discuss the matter."
 
 
The measure needs to pass the House and be signed by President Joe Biden to become law. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer tweeted that the chamber would vote Wednesday.
"I look forward to bringing this bill to the Floor, and urge bipartisan support," Hoyer wrote thanking the bill's bipartisan sponsors.
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